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Beaumont Vets Exeter

Thank your for visiting our website. We pride ourselves on the services we offer and the facilities we have available at the Beaumont Vets Exeter.
We strive to achieve the highest standards of care through compassion, ethical awareness, dedication, conscientiousness and teamwork applied equally to patients, clients and members of staff. Your pet is as important to us as it is to you.
Beaumont Veterinary Centre was first established in Exeter in the late 1970′ s by Dr. Chris Chesney and later moved to Broadclyst. Due to a change in professional direction to specialist dermatology by Dr. Chesney, the practice was taken over by Clive Lloyd in 1994 and moved to its present site in 1995. At the same time, the practice expanded from purely small animal work to a mixed practice due to Clive’s extensive experience and enthusiasm for all creatures great and small. The practice is currently the only truly mixed practice in Exeter.
Between 2003 and 2005 the practice underwent extensive refurbishment and expansion to provide the current modern facilities.

 

Vets Exeter

Male dogs have two testicles that are usually localized in the scrotum, a sac designed to lodge them outside the abdomen. However, dog’s testicles are lodged in their abdomen when they are born. The testicles should have descended from the abdomen to the scrotum by the time dogs are approximately 4 months of age. If by 6 months of age they haven’t descended, they are unlikely to.
The incomplete descent of one or both testicles into the scrotum is medically known as cryptorchidism. When the testicles don’t descend they can stay in an inguinal position (the junction of the legs), where they are usually palpable, or in an abdominal position, in which case they aren’t palpable. Cryptorchidism may occur in all breeds but the toy and miniature ones, such as Pomeranians and Yorkshire Terriers, are at a higher risk. This condition appears to be inherited.
The undescended testicle is smaller than normal and if both testicles are retained the dog may be infertile. Dogs with a retained testicle are more likely to develop a testicular tumour in that testicle and if the spermatic cord of the retained testicle becomes twisted, acute pain may occur.
Pay attention to your puppy’s testicles while he is growing up and if you notice his testicles haven’t descended yet or if you have any doubts about this condition, do not hesitate and bring your pet to the vet!
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Shhh, don't wake him up.
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